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Sulfur Amino Acid Metabolic Process Pathway may Modulate Bipolar Disorder with Alcohol Dependence Comorbidity | OMICS International | Abstract
ISSN: 2155-6105

Journal of Addiction Research & Therapy
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Research Article

Sulfur Amino Acid Metabolic Process Pathway may Modulate Bipolar Disorder with Alcohol Dependence Comorbidity

Enrico Cocchi1, Antonio Drago2* and Alessandro Serretti1

1Department of Biomedical and NeuroMotor Sciences, University of Bologna, Italy

2IRCCS Centro S. Giovanni di Dio, Fatebenefratelli, Brescia, Italy

Corresponding Author:
Antonio Drago
Institute of Psychiatry, University of Bologna
Viale Carlo Pepoli 5, 40123 Bologna, Italy
Tel: +39 051 6584233, +39 320 4269332, +39 347 3024020
Fax: +39 051 521030
E-mail: [email protected]

Received date: January 16, 2014; Accepted date: March 29, 2014; Published date: March 31, 2014

Citation: Cocchi E, Drago A, Serretti A (2014) Sulfur Amino Acid Metabolic Process Pathway may Modulate Bipolar Disorder with Alcohol Dependence Comorbidity. J Addict Res Ther 5:177. doi:10.4172/2155-6105.1000177

Copyright: © 2014 Cocchi E, et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Abstract

Background: A relationship between alcohol use disorder and Bipolar Disorder (BD) has far been detected. A record of alcohol dependence may worsen the course of BD. Nevertheless, the genetic underpinnings of this comorbidity have not been completely elucidated. Authors investigated the impact of a set of genetic variations as possible risk factors for the pathological mood swings in bipolar patients with a record of alcohol dependence.

Methods: A list of candidate genes identified as risk loci by GWAS studies in last 10 years were tested in a sample of 802 bipolar patients from the public available STEP-BD study. Variations harbored by these genes were checked for quality, imputed and pruned. A set of 260 genes embedded in 160 different pathways were analyzed as predictors of the frequency of severe (YMRS>11) manic events and depressive phases (MADRS>19) during the period of observation (1139 days for manic records and 1856 for depressive records). Their effect was tested in combination with alcohol comorbidity. Clinical and sociodemographic variables entered the study as covariates when significantly associated with the phenotypes.

Results: We found an impact of alcohol dependence positive record with a higher frequency of severe manic (p=0.02) and depressive (p=0.0006) records. A positive association between a pathway related to the Sulfur amino acid metabolic process (GO:0000096) and an increased frequency of severe depressive records was detected for BD subjects with a record of alcohol dependence.

Discussion: We found an association between GO: 0000096 (Sulfur amino acid metabolic process pathway) and severe depressive episodes in BD patients with a record of alcohol dependence in their clinical story.

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