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About Importance of Bright Impressions | OMICS International
ISSN: 1522-4821
International Journal of Emergency Mental Health and Human Resilience
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About Importance of Bright Impressions

Delik D. Gabaev*

A.V. Zhirmunsky Institute of Marine Biology, Far Eastern Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Vladivostok, Russia

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Abstract

Many physicists believe, similarly to Stephen Hawking from the Cambridge University, that the relativity theory should give way to a deeper theory, in which the space and the time are absent (Vedral, 2011). Our own observations and literature sources prove that we can feel the future. According to the quantum physics, both the past and the future are undetermined and exist only as a spectrum of possibilities (Mlodinow & Hawking, 2010). According to the theory of relativity by Albert Einstein, there is no any special universal present, but all moments are equally real (Callender, 2010).

Keywords

Momentous information, Sensation of future

Many physicists believe, similarly to Stephen Hawking from the Cambridge University, that the relativity theory should give way to a deeper theory, in which the space and the time are absent (Vedral, 2011). Our own observations and literature sources prove that we can feel the future. According to the quantum physics, both the past and the future are undetermined and exist only as a spectrum of possibilities (Mlodinow & Hawking, 2010). According to the theory of relativity by Albert Einstein, there is no any special universal present, but all moments are equally real (Callender, 2010). Symmetry is inherent to time: it can be directed both from the past to the future, and vice versa (Musser, 2010). My earlier work published by me (Gabaev, 2015) also shows that sleeping regions of brain, according to the relativity theory, are in the future time and can receive information from the future, travelling faster than the velocity of light (von Baeyer, 2013). I repeatedly noticed that if I remembered an ordinary person in the street for a long time, I would work together with him soon. When in real life we suddenly have an emotional outburst and long remember it, most likely this means an omen of our destiny. The problem, which has caused the emotions, will "torment" us for most of our life, and we will try to solve it. In history, there are many examples when emotional outburst altered someone’s life, and the person devoted the remainder of life to solving the problem which he or she had seen. For example, an English noblewoman Florence Nightingale became a well-known medical-surgical nurse; also, my wife became an artist despite she had attended lessons in drawing for only half a year. Her schoolmates forgot these lessons completely 40 years later.

When I studied at school in 1966, I suddenly felt excitement at one of physics lessons, which I have remembered for all my life. That time our teacher described the unusual properties of carbon: the same molecules of carbon, depending on their arrangement, can significantly change properties of a mineral. Later, scientists, who succeeded to obtain one layer of graphite, found a new material, named graphene, also having original and useful properties. For this discovery, they were awarded the Nobel Prize in 2010. However, my excitement grew even more, when the teacher told about superconductivity. He explained that resistance in conductors arises due to collision of electrons with fluctuating nuclei of the conductor. To create superconductivity in a conductor, these nuclei should “fall asleep”, and then electrons will move without obstacles. A low temperature may serve a kind of “sleeping pill” for conductors, thus promoting the superconductivity to arise. Approximately during the same time, I remembered the educational film that proved constancy of the velocity of light. As was told in the film, the velocity of light from a moving steam locomotive is equal to that from a spotlight installed on a platform, because time inside a moving locomotive is slowing down. More than 20 years later, when I saw a dream in the morning and it completely repeated in the evening, I did not ignore it and, instead, started to think how it could have occurred. I understood that it had been a weak signal from the future, but when I began thinking about how this weak signal could have passed through the closed eyes via the neurons of my brain to be fixed in memory, I recollected the words of our teacher: when nuclei in a conductor sleep, superconductivity arises. Also, I recollected the idea from the educational film that in a moving steam locomotive time is slowing down. Hence, it is logical to suppose that in a sleeping person time is, vice versa, accelerating. Later on, I sometimes saw prophetic dreams, and they were remembered because in reality I had an emotional excitement. It means that an emotionally colored event from the future easier gets into the brain during sleep. As we know from literature, the final, fifth, stage of sleep—rapid eye movement (REM)—makes a sleeping person closer to the state of the dead, and even the body temperature decreases (Morrison, 1983); however, it is much higher than the temperature of liquid nitrogen, promoting superconductivity in cuprates. That moment I recollected a publication about frozen cuprates, on the surfaces of which a pyramidal roughness can be observed at high magnification (Gerber et al., 1991). This probably promotes superconductivity, as in pyramids the temperature of onset of superconductivity is higher (Gatsunaev, 1999). Then I had an idea that low temperatures cause crystals to form on cuprates and pnictides, and these crystals protect the conductor from the external electromagnetic field causing fluctuations in nuclei of the crystal lattice. In other words, if a conductor is protected from an external electromagnetic field, nuclei in its crystal lattice will "fall asleep", and this will facilitate electric current to pass through the conductor. Subsequently, 30 years after this prophetic dream, I thought: “What if skull bones protect neurons of the brain from an external electromagnetic field, and nuclei in axoplasm of neurons fall asleep, which facilitates passage of a signal through them?” To verify this hypothesis, I covered iron wires with melt bone glue, and this coating proved to reduce resistance to electric current in them to zero (Gabaev, 2013). Certainly, this coating is fragile, but it can be improved by applying rubber glue on a thin layer of bone glue. In this case, the coating will be waterproof and shock-resistant (Gabaev, 2014).

In this article, I show that if you felt some excitement at any event or story being told in your youth, it should not be ignored; instead, try to consider them attentively. Most likely, these instructions are for all your life. The earlier you begin solving the arisen problem, the sooner you solve it. To me, physics was not the most important subject, as my profession is marine biologist. Hence, I was solving the problem, which I had got at school, during quite a long time. Probably, if I had trusted my feelings and become a physicist, I would have solved it earlier.

References

Callender, C. (2010). Time as illusion. Scientific American, 08-09, 32-39.

Gabaev, DD. (2013). Covering of conductors can aid in problems, related to room-temperature superconductivity, Technology and Innovation, 9(2), 69-75.

Gabaev, DD. (2014). Knowledge of the mechanism of dreams can aid in problems related to room-temperature superconductivity. Journal of Environmental Polymer Degradation, 2(1), 6-11.

Gabaev, DD. (2015). Discoveries in phisics can explain our thoughts and acts. American Journal of Applied Psychology, 3(1), 6-10.

Gatsunaev, N. (1999). Rectification of space, Be sound! Science and Education Publishing, 9, 96-99.

Gerber, C., Anselmetti D., Bednorz J.G., Mannhart J., Schlom D.G. (1991). Screw dislocations in high -Tc films. Nature, 350(6316), 279-280.

Mlodinow, L., & Hawking, S. (2010). The imperceptible uniform theory of all. Scientific American, 11-12, 6-9.

Morrison, EP. (1983). Window in a sleeping brain. Scientific American, 6, 62-70.

Musser, G. (2010). Whether time can end? Scientific American, 11-12, 98-107.

Vedral, V. (2011). A life in the quantum world. Scientific American, 8, 14-21.

von Baeyer, HCh. (2013). Quantum strangeness? It is all at you in the head! Scientific American, 12, 80-86.

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