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How Adolescents and Parents Food Shopping Patterns and Social Interaction when Shopping is Associated with Dietary Outcomes in Rural Communities | OMICS International | Abstract
ISSN: 2165-7904

Journal of Obesity & Weight Loss Therapy
Open Access

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Research Article

How Adolescents and Parents Food Shopping Patterns and Social Interaction when Shopping is Associated with Dietary Outcomes in Rural Communities

Alison Gustafson*, Qishan Wu, Colleen Spees, Nicolle Putnam, Ingrid Adams, Danielle Harp, Heather Bush, and Chris Taylor
Department of Nutrition, University of Kentucky, USA
Corresponding Author : Alison Gustafson
Assistant Professor, University of Kentucky
Nutrition, 206g Funkhouser, Lexington, KY 40502, USA
Tel: 8592571309
E-mail: [email protected]
Received April 14, 2014; Accepted May 02, 2014; Published May 06, 2014
Citation: Gustafson A, Wu Q, Spees C, Putnam N, Adams I, et al. (2014) How Adolescents and Parents Food Shopping Patterns and Social Interaction when Shopping is Associated with Dietary Outcomes in Rural Communities. J Obes Weight Loss Ther 4:214. doi:10.4172/2165-7904.1000214
Copyright: © 2014 Gustafson A, et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Abstract

Objective: The aim of this study was to: 1) Describe the bi-directional relationship between parent and adolescent food shopping patterns and behaviors. 2) Assess the association between adolescent and parent self-reported food shopping behaviors, dietary patterns and body mass index. Design: Cross-sectional survey. Setting: Four rural counties in Kentucky and Ohio, United States, 2013 Subjects: Adolescents, ages 13-18, and their primary caregiver who conducted at least 25% of the food shopping. Results: Close to 60% of adolescents report grocery shopping with their parent. There was almost complete agreement between the parent and adolescent for eating fast-food together (p=0.0069), but low agreement on purchasing food from convenience stores (p=0.15). Adolescents who purchase food from school vending, gas stations, and convenience stores combined often consumed more added sugars and sugar-sweetened beverages(SSB) (2.66 [95% CI 0.43, 4.90]). Lastly, those who shopped with a friend at a fast food establishment consumed more mean added sugars. Conclusion: Adolescents and parents are influenced by their social and food store shopping behaviors. Policies and interventions need to address cumulative shopping behavior practices and social interactions within these venues.

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