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ISSN: 2165-7904

Journal of Obesity & Weight Loss Therapy
Open Access

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Research Article

Lessons Learned from a Community Based Lifestyle Intervention for Youth at Risk for Type 2 Diabetes

Eva M Vivian1*, Lisa H Colbert2, Patrick L Remington3
1University of Wisconsin-Madison, School of Pharmacy, Madison, USA
2Departments of Kinesiology and Population Health Sciences, 2035 Gymnasium-Natatorium, 2000 Observatory Drive, Madison, USA
3UW School of Medicine and Public Health, Health Sciences Learning Center, Room 4263, 750 Highland Avenue Madison, USA
Corresponding Author : Eva M Vivian
Associate Professor
University of Wisconsin-Madison
School of Pharmacy, 777 Highland Avenue
Madison, WI 53705, USA
Tel: 608-263-1779
E-mail: [email protected]
Received August 06, 2013; Accepted September 10, 2013; Published September 13, 2013
Citation: Vivian EM, Colbert LH, Remington PL (2013) Lessons Learned from a Community Based Lifestyle Intervention for Youth at Risk for Type 2 Diabetes. J Obes Weight Loss Ther 3:191. doi:10.4172/2165-7904.1000191
Copyright: © 2013 Colbert LH, et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Abstract

Purpose: This pilot study examined the feasibility and acceptability of a peer led diabetes prevention intervention for youth in an underserved community. Methods: Children and adolescents randomized to the intervention group participated in a one year program which included peer support, physical activity, and family nutrition and behavior modification sessions. Participants were asked about their satisfaction with the study and possible benefits, what they learned, and whether they would recommend participation to a friend. Youth randomized to the control group received monthly healthy lifestyle educational materials through the mail. Results: Children and adolescents (n=67) with an average age of 12.5 years and BMI greater than or equal to 85 percentile for age and sex were enrolled in the study. The average monthly participation rate varied between 90 and 50 percent with a mean rate of 82 percent. Ninety four percent of parents reported being very satisfied with the program and all (100%) reported they would recommend the program to a friend. All the children and adolescents (100%) reported that they enjoyed working with the youth peer coaches and 94% felt their assigned coach was a good role model. The observed changes in BMI z-score trended towards improvement in the intervention group, but this study was underpowered to detect differences between groups. Conclusion: The peer led diabetes prevention program was feasible and acceptable and demonstrated potential for improving health behaviors.

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