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Variation in the Kinematic Response of Cervical Spine, Proprioception and Muscle Activity During Anterior Load Carriage-An Experimental Study | OMICS International | Abstract
ISSN: 2165-7025

Journal of Novel Physiotherapies
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Research Article

Variation in the Kinematic Response of Cervical Spine, Proprioception and Muscle Activity During Anterior Load Carriage-An Experimental Study

Damandeep Kour1, Siddhartha Sen2* and Amit Dhawan3
1Student, Sardar Bhagwan Singh Post Graduate Institute of Biomedical Sciences and Research, Balawala, Dehradun, Uttarakhand, India
2Associate Professor, Sardar Bhagwan Singh Post Graduate Institute of Biomedical Sciences and Research, Balawala, Dehradun, Uttarakhand, India
3Assistant Professor, Sardar Bhagwan Singh Post Graduate Institute of Biomedical Sciences and Research, Balawala, Dehradun, Uttarakhand, India
Corresponding Author : Siddhartha Sen
Sardar Bhagwan Singh Post Graduate
Institute of Biomedical Sciences and Research
Balawala, Dehradun, Uttarakhand, India
Tel: 919412985124
E-mail: [email protected]
Received October 28 2014; Accepted November 29, 2014; Published December 6, 2014
Citation: Kour D, Sen S, Dhawan A (2014) Variation in the Kinematic Response of Cervical Spine, Proprioception and Muscle Activity During Anterior Load Carriage-An Experimental Study. J Nov Physiother 4:236. doi: 10.4172/2165-7025.1000236
Copyright: © 2014 Damandeep Kour, et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Abstract

Background: Front load carriage is a common occupational task in some industries (e.g. agriculture, construction). Previous studies were conducted to examine the effects of load carriage on changes in thoracic and lumbar spine rather than the effects on the cervical spine. The focus of this study was to explore kinetic and kinematic response of cervical spine the during anterior load carriage and, specifically, to examine the effects of load height on neck muscle activity and neck posture. Despite the evidence linking between load carriage and kinetic and kinematic response, previous studies to examine lumbar spine rather than the effects on the cervical spine.

Methodology: 30 female participants participated in this front load-carriage experiment. The experiment called for carrying a barbell (with weight corresponding to 10% of body weight of the participant) at three heights (knuckle height, elbow height and shoulder height) at a constant horizontal distance from the spine. In this experiment, the participants performed this task while standing still. As they performed this task, the activity level of the upper trapezius was sampled. Craniovertebral angle and proprioception of cervical spine were also quantified using photographic method and magnetic inclinometer respectively at these three heights.

Results: The results showed a significant effect of load height on muscle activity, craniovertebral angle and proprioception (flexion) of cervical spine levels in the barbell experiment but insignificant effect for proprioception (extension) of cervical spine.

Conclusion: These results provide insight into muscle activation patterns, proprioception and kinematic response of cervical spine especially (load) carrying biomechanics, and have implications in industrial settings that require workers to carry loads in front of their bodies.

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