alexa Communication of Diagnosis in Elderly Lung Cancer Patients: Who is Informed, What Information is Given and What Patients Know and Want to Know | OMICS International | Abstract
ISSN: 2165-7386

Journal of Palliative Care & Medicine
Open Access

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Research Article

Communication of Diagnosis in Elderly Lung Cancer Patients: Who is Informed, What Information is Given and What Patients Know and Want to Know

Regina Gironés*

Oncologist, Physician, Medical Oncology Unit, Hospital Lluís Alcanyís, Xàtiva, Spain

*Corresponding Author:
Regina Gironés
Oncologist, Physician, Medical Oncology Unit
Hospital Lluís Alcanyís, Xàtiva, Spain
Tel: 34-96-228-95-79
E-mail: [email protected]

Received date: July 06, 2014; Accepted date: August 26, 2014; Published date: September 06, 2014

Citation: Gironés R (2014) Communication of Diagnosis in Elderly Lung Cancer Patients: Who is Informed, What Information is Given and What Patients Know and Want to Know. J Palliat Care Med 4:184. doi: 10.4172/2165-7386.1000184

Copyright: © 2014 Gironés R. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Abstract

Objectives: Lung cancerchemotherapy decisions in patients >70 years old are complex. To assess the modes of communication with older lung cancer patients, we prospectively collected data. We assessed patients’ level of knowledge about diagnosis and prognosis.
Materials and Methods: 83 patients diagnosed with lung cancer from January 2006 to February 2008 were recruited from a single center. Logistic regression and multiple imputation methods were used to assess associations between patient information and independent variables.
Results: Families received the diagnosis of lung cancer (92.8%). Family was more protective when the patients were elderly (p:0,036), depressed (p: 0,054), had dementia (p:0,03), had poor performance status (p:0,03) or complied with frailty criteria (p: 0,014). Physicians who gave cancer diagnoses were not oncologists and they usually gave cancer diagnosis preferably to family members. Only 27,7% of patients were informed that they had tumors. 73,5% of
patients actively solicited information, however elderly and frail patients tended to do so less.
Conclusions: A large proportion of elderly lung cancer patients do not receive adequate information about their disease prior to contact with oncologists. However they do actively ask for information and speak about cancer with oncologists.

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