alexa Paternalism and the Utilization of Advance Care Directives | OMICS International | Abstract
ISSN: 2165-7386

Journal of Palliative Care & Medicine
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Review Article

Paternalism and the Utilization of Advance Care Directives

Ekore Rabi Ilemona1*, Lanre-Abass Bolatito2, Ekore John3 and Ajayi Ikeoluwapo4

1University Health Service, Jaja Clinic, University of Ibadan, Nigeria

2Department of Philosophy, University of Ibadan, Nigeria

3Department of Psychology, University of Ibadan, Nigeria

4Department of Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, University of Ibadan, Nigeria

*Corresponding Author:
Ekore Rabi Ilemona
University Health Service, Jaja Clinic
University of Ibadan, Nigeria
E-mail: [email protected]

Received date: April 07, 2012; Accepted date: July 26, 2012; Published date: July 28, 2012

Citation: Ilemona ER, Bolatito LA, John E, Ikeoluwapo A (2012) Paternalism and the Utilization of Advance Care Directives. J Palliative Care Med 2:135. doi:10.4172/2165-7386.1000135

Copyright: © 2012 Ilemona ER, et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.



Abstract

The End-of-life period requires attention to total care of persons suffering from life-limiting or terminal illnesses. Rendering this type of care can alter the quality of life, though it is not expected to cure the fundamental underlying diseases or to arrest their progression. Paternalism in medicine has become unpopular because it entails physicians telling patients what is, or is not good for them, without regards to the patient’s own needs and interests. There is increasing awareness of the fact that patients have right to self-determination over how they are treated and the principle of respect for self-autonomy imposes on the attending physician and other health workers a duty to respect this right. During the end-of-life period, however, a patient may be incompetent and unable to exercise this right. Thus, there may be a need to plan in advance, by the making and utilization of advance care directives. This article discusses patient care during the end-of-life period, the issue of advance care directives and paternalism in the light of some ethical theories and the role paternalism plays in its making and utilization of advance care directives.

Keywords

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