alexa Racial/Ethnic Variations in Colorectal Cancer Screening Self-Efficacy,Fatalism and Risk Perception in a Safety-Net Clinic Population: Implications for Tailored Interventions | Abstract
ISSN: 2161-0711

Journal of Community Medicine & Health Education
Open Access

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Research Article

Racial/Ethnic Variations in Colorectal Cancer Screening Self-Efficacy,Fatalism and Risk Perception in a Safety-Net Clinic Population: Implications for Tailored Interventions

Lumpkins CY1*, Cupertino P2, Young K3, Daley C1, Yeh HW4 and Greiner KA1

1Center Department of Family Medicine, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, Kansas, 66160, USA

2Department of Preventive Medicine, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, Kansas, 66160, USA

3Department of Epidemiology, Carolina Population Center, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, 27599, USA

4Department of Biostatistics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, Kansas, 66160, USA

*Corresponding Author:
Crystal Y Lumpkins
Department of Family Medicine
University of Kansas Medical Center
Kansas City, KS 66160, USA
Tel: 913-588-1931
Fax: 913-588-2095
E-mail: [email protected]

Received date: November 29, 2012; Accepted date: January 23, 2013; Published date: January 25, 2013

Citation: Lumpkins CY, Cupertino P, Young K, Daley C, Yeh HW, et al. (2013) Racial/Ethnic Variations in Colorectal Cancer Screening Self-Efficacy, Fatalism and Risk Perception in a Safety-Net Clinic Population: Implications for Tailored Interventions. J Community Med Health Educ 3:196. doi:10.4172/2161-0711.1000196

Copyright: © 2013 Lumpkins CY, et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Abstract

Ethnic and racial minority groups in the U.S. receive fewer colorectal cancer (CRC) screening tests and are less likely to be up-to-date with CRC screening than the population as a whole. Access, limited awareness of CRC and barriers may, in part, be responsible for inhibiting widespread adoption of CRC screening among racial and ethnic minority groups. The purpose of this study was to examine the role of self-efficacy, fatalism and CRC risk perception across racial and ethnic groups in a diverse sample. This study was a cross-sectional analysis from baseline measures gathered on a group of patients recruited into a trial to track colorectal cancer screening in underserved adults over 50. Out of 470 Participants, 42% were non-Hispanic; 27% Hispanic and 28% non-Hispanic White. Hispanic and non- Hispanic Blacks were more likely to have fatalistic beliefs about CRC than non-Hispanic Whites. Non-Hispanic Blacks perceived higher risk of getting colon cancer. Self-efficacy for completing CRC screening was higher among Non- Hispanic Blacks than among Hispanics. Racial and ethnic differences in risk perceptions, fatalism and self-efficacy should be taken into consideration in future CRC interventions with marginalized and uninsured populations.

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