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Teens as Teachers: Improving Recruitment and Training of Adolescent Standardized Patients in a Simulated Patient Encounter | OMICS International | Abstract
ISSN: 2161-0711

Journal of Community Medicine & Health Education
Open Access

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Research Article

Teens as Teachers: Improving Recruitment and Training of Adolescent Standardized Patients in a Simulated Patient Encounter

Anton Alerte, Stacey Brown*, Jessica Hoag, Helen Wu, Teresa Sapieha-Yanchak, Carol Pfeiffer, Karen Harrington and Jane Palley

University of Connecticut, School of Medicine, Farmington, CT, USA

*Corresponding Author:
Stacey Brown
University of Connecticut, School of Medicine Community Medicine and Health Care
Farmington, CT 06030-1925, USA
Tel: +1860-679-2354
E-mail: [email protected]

Received date: March 25, 2015; Accepted date: April 30, 2015; Published date: May 3, 2015

Citation: Alerte A, Brown S, Hoag J, Wu H, Sapieha-Yanchak T, et al. (2015) Teens as Teachers: Improving Recruitment and Training of Adolescent Standardized Patients in a Simulated Patient Encounter. J Community Med Health Educ 5: 350. doi: 10.4172/2161-0711.1000350

Copyright: © Alerte A, et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Abstract

Background: Studies in medical education have reliably established the importance of utilizing adolescents as standardized patients. Their realistic portrayals offer authentic learning experiences. Additionally, the curricula can offer the adolescent participants a meaningful educational opportunity.

Methods: The “Teens as Teachers” program was developed at the University of Connecticut, School of Medicine, to prepare second year medical students to interview, elicit a history and address issues related to risk behaviors in adolescent standardized patients. In addition, the program offers educational and mentoring opportunities for the teenaged participants.

Results: The twenty-four adolescents trained as standardized patients have worked with 359 second year medical students. Results reveal that the adolescents felt the training adequately prepared them for their cases, found the overall experience rewarding and 100% of the adolescents would return to participate if possible. 88.6% of medical students rated the cases authentic, 98.8% found then valuable, 94.2% were able to practice the skills learned during lecture and 96.8% received feedback from the adolescent standardized patients.

Conclusion: Utilizing adolescent standardized patients to teach interviewing skills to medical students can prepare them to elicit comprehensive histories and can be a beneficial learning experience for the teenaged participants.

Keywords

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