alexa

GET THE APP

Exploring Patterns in Referrals to Combat Stress for Uk Veterans with Mental Health Difficulties between 1994 and 2014 | OMICS International | Abstract
ISSN: 1522-4821

International Journal of Emergency Mental Health and Human Resilience
Open Access

Our Group organises 3000+ Global Conferenceseries Events every year across USA, Europe & Asia with support from 1000 more scientific Societies and Publishes 700+ Open Access Journals which contains over 50000 eminent personalities, reputed scientists as editorial board members.

Open Access Journals gaining more Readers and Citations
700 Journals and 15,000,000 Readers Each Journal is getting 25,000+ Readers

This Readership is 10 times more when compared to other Subscription Journals (Source: Google Analytics)

Research Article

Exploring Patterns in Referrals to Combat Stress for Uk Veterans with Mental Health Difficulties between 1994 and 2014

Murphy D1,2,*, Weijers B3, Palmer E4, Busuttil W5

1Lecturer in Clinical Psychology, Combat Stress, Leatherhead, UK

2King’s Centre for Military Health Research, Department of Psychological Medicine, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King’s College London, London, UK

3Senior Data Analyst, Combat Stress, Leatherhead, UK

4Research Assistant, Combat Stress, Leatherhead, UK

5Clinical Director, Combat Stress, Leatherhead, UK

*Corresponding Author:
E-mail: [email protected]

Abstract

Little is known about the patterns of help-seeking in UK veterans with mental health difficulties. The aim of this study was to explore referral patterns to Combat Stress over a 20 year period. Combat Stress is a national mental health charity that offers support to UK ex-service personnel. Data was extracted from an electronic patient database system that included information on referrals to Combat Stress between 1994 and 2014. Data included time since leaving the Forces, area of deployment and whether participants engaged in clinical services. A fourfold increase in the number of referrals received each year over the duration of the study period was observed. Ex-service personnel who had served in Northern Ireland made up the largest proportion of helpseekers. In recent years significant increases in referrals from veterans from Iraq and Afghanistan were noted. Over the study period the time it took for participants to seek help after they left the services reduced by a half. There has been a recent sharp increase in veterans seeking support for mental health difficulties. This may reflect a period effect with individuals more willing to seek help sooner now than in the past. For example, veterans from Iraq and Afghanistan are seeking help more quickly than veterans from previous conflicts. The data presented within this paper suggests that there will continue to be an increase in the numbers of veterans seeking support for mental health difficulties over the coming years.

Google Scholar citation report
Citations : 1498

International Journal of Emergency Mental Health and Human Resilience received 1498 citations as per Google Scholar report

International Journal of Emergency Mental Health and Human Resilience peer review process verified at publons
Indexed In
  • Index Copernicus
  • Google Scholar
  • Open J Gate
  • Academic Keys
  • ResearchBible
  • CiteFactor
  • Cosmos IF
  • CINAHL Complete
  • Scimago
  • British Library
  • SCOPUS
  • RefSeek
  • Hamdard University
  • EBSCO A-Z
  • World Catalogue of Scientific Journals
  • OCLC- WorldCat
  • Proquest Summons
  • Publons
  • University Of Baltimore
  • University Grants Commission
  • Geneva Foundation for Medical Education and Research
  • Euro Pub
  • University of Lincoln
Share This Page
Top