alexa Neuroplasticity, Central Sensitization and Odontogenic Referred Orofacial Pain | OMICS International | Abstract
ISSN: 2167-0846

Journal of Pain & Relief
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Case Report

Neuroplasticity, Central Sensitization and Odontogenic Referred Orofacial Pain

Xiuxin Liu* and Tallents Ross
Department of Dentistry, Eastman Institute for Oral Health, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, New York, USA
Corresponding Author : Xiuxin Liu, DDS,PHD
Eastman Institute for Oral Health
University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry
Rochester, New York, 14620, USA
E-mail: [email protected]
Received: August 21, 2015 Accepted: October 29, 2015 Published: October 31, 2015
Citation: Liu X, Ross T (2015) Neuroplasticity, Central Sensitization and Odontogenic Referred Orofacial Pain. J Pain Relief 4:206. doi:10.4172/21670846.1000206
Copyright: © 2015 Liu X, et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
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Abstract

Patients presenting with referred dental orofacial pain are not rare in dental clinics. The most common cause for referred dental craniofacial pain is of odontogenic origin. An accurate diagnosis will depend on a comprehensive clinical exam and dental history review. For differential diagnosis, it is critical to consider both the odontognic and nonodontogenic etiology. Once a correct diagnosis is established, a proper treatment can be administrated by elimination of the etiology. We describe the updated mechanism for referred pain with neuronal plasticity and central sensitization theory. Through clinical cases, we elucidate how the diagnosis of odontogenic referred dental craniofacial pain is achieved, and the etiology is established. Because of its complex nature, odontogenic referred dental craniofacial pain can be misdiagnosed and patients may receive unnecessary procedures. Proper knowledge and strategy would help to achieve success in the diagnosis and treatment of odontogenic referred dental orofacial pain.

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