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Fitness Versus Fatness? | OMICS International
Aerobics & Fitness
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Fitness Versus Fatness?

Robert Alan Sloan*
Department of Psychosomatic Medicine, Graduate Medical School, Kagoshima University, Japan
*Corresponding Author : Sloan RA
Graduate Medical School
Department of Psychosomatic Medicine
Kagoshima University, Japan
Tel: +81 80 2784 8155
E-mail: [email protected]
Rec date: March 28, 2016; Acc date: March 29, 2016; Pub date: March 31, 2016
Citation: Sloan RA (2016) Fitness Versus Fatness?. J Aerobics Fitness 1:e102. doi:10.4172/jafo.1000e102
Copyright: © 2016 Sloan RA. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

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Abstract

The continued understanding of the role that health-related fitness plays in preventing chronic diseases such as type 2 diabetes is imperative. Two key components of health-related fitness are cardiovascular endurance (fitness) and body composition (fatness).

Editorial
The continued understanding of the role that health-related fitness plays in preventing chronic diseases such as type 2 diabetes is imperative. Two key components of health-related fitness are cardiovascular endurance (fitness) and body composition (fatness). Though the fit versus fat debate has received marked attention in recent years regarding the longevity of life, less is known regarding disease prevention [1]. Fitter individuals tend to be less fat but this is not always the case, and conversely, leaner individuals are not always more fit. Therefore, a more nuanced understanding is needed regarding the interplay of fitness and fatness. The results of some studies have indicated that fatness plays more of an important role in the onset of diabetes while other studies showed that fitness and fatness are comparable contributors. For this reason, fitness and fatness may better be represented in tandem. Therefore, a new approach for capturing relative degree of fitness and fatness is now under investigation termed the fit-fat index (FFI) [2]. This single index may provide a method whereby degree of change in fitness, fatness or both indicates a reduction in risk. In short, FFI may provide a better way of setting health-related fitness goals that improve self-efficacy and sustain behavior change towards disease prevention.
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