alexa TUBERCULOSIS INFECTION AND TREATMENT OUTCOME IN ZARIA, NORTH WESTERN NIGERIA- A NINE YEAR (2007-2015) EPIDEMIOLOGICAL REVIEW | 55727
ISSN: 2161-1165

Epidemiology: Open Access
Open Access

Like us on:

Our Group organises 3000+ Global Conferenceseries Events every year across USA, Europe & Asia with support from 1000 more scientific Societies and Publishes 700+ Open Access Journals which contains over 50000 eminent personalities, reputed scientists as editorial board members.

Open Access Journals gaining more Readers and Citations
700 Journals and 15,000,000 Readers Each Journal is getting 25,000+ Readers

This Readership is 10 times more when compared to other Subscription Journals (Source: Google Analytics)

TUBERCULOSIS INFECTION AND TREATMENT OUTCOME IN ZARIA, NORTH WESTERN NIGERIA- A NINE YEAR (2007-2015) EPIDEMIOLOGICAL REVIEW

4th International Conference on Epidemiology & Public Health

Oyefabi Adegboyega and Lawrence Alalade

Kaduna State University, Nigeria Ladiya Clinic, Nigeria

ScientificTracks Abstracts: Epidemiology (Sunnyvale)

DOI: 10.4172/2161-1165.C1.014

Abstract
Tuberculosis (TB) kills nearly 3 million persons per year worldwide. Most cases occur in middle and low income countries. In Sub Sahara Africa, Nigeria accounts for the highest absolute number of TB morbidity being the 4th among 22 most TB infected countries globally. This study is a retrospective, descriptive cross-sectional review of the TB registers of 4054 clients who accessed TB health care services at 25 Primary Health Care facilities in Zaria, North western Nigeria between the years 2007-2015. Adult Males (64.2%), age group 25-34 were most affected. They presented mainly with pulmonary TB (88.5%). Only half of the clients (50.3%) had the smear positive results before commencement of the directly observed Short course therapy (DOTs) with either 2RHZE/6EH or 2SRHZE/IRHZE/5RHE depending on clients’ category. Human immune deficiency virus (HIV) co-infection was 19.1%. Post DOTs, 27.8% were confirmed bacteriologically cured, 52.4% completed treatment but no document to confirm cured, 6.9% defaulted, and 4.3% were transferred out, while 5.8% TB mortality occurred. The determinants of the outcome of treatment were HIV status, degree of smear positivity before treatment, clients’ residential address, DOTs Centre, clients’ age and sex (p<0.05). The cure rate was below the recommended 80% by the World Health organization. There is a need for the Nigeria government in collaboration with international agencies to intensify effort at TB surveillance, monitoring and control activities in Nigeria.
Biography

Oyefabi Adegboyega Omoniyi is a Lecturer/ Public Health Physician with the Kaduna State University. He graduated from the Ahmadu Bello University in 2003. He had his residency training in Community health certified by the West African College of Physician in 2013. He worked as a Medical officer and Consultant Physician in State and Federal institutions in Nigeria. He was the coordinator of the HIV, TB and immunization services for the Federal Medical Centre, Birnin Kebbi, Nigeria, before joining the Kaduna state University in 2014.His research interest focus on the development of Public health system in Nigeria.

Email: [email protected]

Top