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Gail Geller | OMICS International
ISSN: 2165-7386

Journal of Palliative Care & Medicine
Open Access

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Gail Geller

Department of Paediatrics, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, USA Berman Institute of Bioethics, Johns Hopkins University, USA Department of Health, Behaviour & Society, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, USA McKusick-Nathans Institute of Genetic Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, USA Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, USA

Biography

Gail Geller is affiliated to Department of Paediatrics, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.Dr. Gail Geller is a Professor of Medicine in the General Internal Medicine division.  She holds a bachelor's degree from Cornell University and a master of health science degree from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Her research interests have focused on clinical-patient communication under conditions of uncertainty, professionalism and humanism in medical education, cross-cultural variation in concepts of health and disease, and clinician suffering and moral distress. She has explored these interests in a range of health care contexts in which uncertainty looms large, including genetics and genomics, complementary & alternative medicine, and palliative care

Research Interest

Her research interests have focused on clinical-patient communication under conditions of uncertainty, professionalism and humanism in medical education, cross-cultural variation in concepts of health and disease, and clinician suffering and moral distress

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