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Management Of Macrophomina Phaseolina Causing Dry Root Rot By PGPR Strains And Indigenous Composts | 10351
ISSN: 2157-7625

Journal of Ecosystem & Ecography
Open Access

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Management of Macrophomina phaseolina causing dry root rot by PGPR strains and indigenous composts

2nd International Conference on Biodiversity & Sustainable Energy Development

Jyoti Saxena, Meenaxi and Sumati Chaudhary

Accepted Abstracts: J Ecosys Ecograph

DOI: 10.4172/2157-7625.S1.014

Abstract
Biological control of soil borne plant pathogens has been described as a safe strategy to reduce crop damage. In recent years, considerable attention has been paid to plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR), many of which are aggressive root colonizers and play an important role in management of plant diseases caused by soil borne plant pathogens. Besides, the compost is also considered as a natural pesticide for soil as it is an excellent source of nutrition and moisture which favour native antagonist to proliferate and suppress the soil borne diseases. Macrophomina phaseolina is a common soil pathogen which causes charcoal rot in various economically important plant species. The present paper deals with in vitro and in vivo characterization of PGPR strains isolated from rhizosphere soil of agriculture crops and four different composts for their potential as biocontrol agent. The antagonistic activities were found in solid and dual liquid culture media which were further confirmed by light and scanning electron microscopic studies. Strains were also found positive for siderophore, HCN, NH 3 and chitinase activities, traits responsible for conferring the antifungal activity. In vivo studies not only showed the reduction in disease incidence but also the improvement in growth and yield of plants. Four indigenous composts prepared from readily available organic wastes viz. vermicompost, banana, nadep and Calotropis were used for growth and disease suppression in mungbean. It can be concluded from the studies that PGPR strains and composts have potential to inhibit Macrophomina phaseolina when supplied in agricultural field, thereby, supporting the sustainable agriculture
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