alexa
Reach Us +44-1522-440391
Warming The Climate Change Affects Human Health | 4506
ISSN: 2157-7625

Journal of Ecosystem & Ecography
Open Access

Like us on:

OMICS International organises 3000+ Global Conferenceseries Events every year across USA, Europe & Asia with support from 1000 more scientific Societies and Publishes 700+ Open Access Journals which contains over 50000 eminent personalities, reputed scientists as editorial board members.

Open Access Journals gaining more Readers and Citations
700 Journals and 15,000,000 Readers Each Journal is getting 25,000+ Readers

This Readership is 10 times more when compared to other Subscription Journals (Source: Google Analytics)
All submissions of the EM system will be redirected to Online Manuscript Submission System. Authors are requested to submit articles directly to Online Manuscript Submission System of respective journal.

Warming the climate change affects human health

Biodiversity & Sustainable Energy Development-2012

Sagar M Gawande

Posters: J Ecosyst Ecogr

DOI: 10.4172/2157-7625.S1.009

Abstract
Since the industrial revolution the activities of humankind increasing emission of Green House Gases (GHG) will induce a long-term change in the universal environment. These gases comprise mainly, Carbon-dioxide (CO 2 ) mostly from fuel combustion in vehicles, aero planes, and locomotives and burning of woods in domestic as well as industries, and in combination with temperature-trapping gases like methane (CH 4 ) from different sources of production, nitrous oxide and various human- made chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). The presence of these gases in the lower part of atmosphere has contributed to the rapid increase in global average temperature. And it takes progressive part in climate change. This Climate change is expected to increase average temperatures as well as the number and intensity of heat-waves. These are associated with increases in morbidity and mortality in the very short time span, especially in populations who are not conformed to extremely hot weather. Particular risk groups include persons with respiratory and cardiovascular disorders; the aged, as well as physically and mentally handicapped and others who are not capable of caring for them-selves during an extreme event of heat-waves are at major concern. The increase in temperatures makes water shortage and water in great quantity resulting from flooding or heavy precipitation has been shown to be related to diseases like diarrhea. After a flood-event, rates of diarrhoeal disease, includes cholera, also increases, especially in areas where poor sanitation facilities. Heavy rainfall, even without flooding, may increase rates of diarrhoeal disease as toilets or sewage systems overflow. Increases in surface run-off may contaminate water sources. With the heavy precipitation it is expected to become more common that rates of diarrhoeal diseases may increase.
Biography
Sagar Gawande, completed my Diploma in Civil and Rural Engineering, from Dr. Punjabrao Deshmukh Polytechnic, Amrawati and Bachelor of Engineering from Amrawati University of Maharastra, now pursuing Master Degree in Environmental Engineering from same university, having professional life memberships of Indian Water Works Association (IWWA) as well as for India Chapter of American Concrete Institute (ACI). Since last two years working as lecturer in Civil Engineering Department at Rajgad Dnyanpeeth?s Technical Campus, Shree Chattrapati Shivajiraje College of Engineering, affiliated to Pune University. Actively concentrate on climate change from last three-four years
Relevant Topics
Leave Your Message 24x7
Top