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Modelling Health Outcomes Of Opiate Users And Their Children | 4216
ISSN: 2155-6105

Journal of Addiction Research & Therapy
Open Access

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Modelling health outcomes of opiate users and their children

International Conference and Exhibition on Addiction Research & Therapy

Maeve Daly, Catherine Comiskey, Jennie Milnes and Orla Dempsey

Posters: J Addict Res Ther

DOI: 10.4172/2155-6105.S1.008

Abstract
International evidence on treatment outcomes for opiate use clearly demonstrates that treatment improves outcomes for drug use, crime committal and social functioning. However, recent evidence in an Irish setting identified a failure to demonstrate any significant improvements in the physical and psychological wellbeing of users, across different treatment modalities for opiate use. Furthermore, many opiate users are parents who are either caring for their child in the home or have children in foster care. This study addresses the identified gap in knowledge in relation to the physical and mental health outcomes of a population of opiate users and their children, and provides evidence for policy recommendations for service. A sample of 173 adult opiate users in treatment (substitute maintenance) or not in treatment (using needle exchange services) were recruited through a number of out-patient treatment settings. The sample was assessed using a number of measures, including the SF-12, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI). Those who were parents completed the Kidscreen-27 tool and Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) in relation to their youngest childs wellbeing. Family history of substance misuse was also assessed. Participants self-rated health was fair to poor with high rates of moderate to severe levels of symptoms of anxiety and depression reported. A third of the sample provided data on their youngest childs health and wellbeing. The results indicate borderline emotional and conduct problems. These findings raise important questions for the adequacy of drug treatment policy and practice and child and family health services
Biography

Maeve Daly is pursuing her Ph.D degree in the School of Nursing and Midwifery, Trinity College Dublin. Her research interests are addiction, substance misuse and quantitative methods in modelling health outcomes

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